Ro Digga and Haz Matt help show how HIP-Cuyahoga is creating a healthy opportunities for all

HIP-Cuyahoga successfully coordinated the collection of personal care products, and then the distribution at the Food Pantry and Care Pack Drive on Saturday, August 18th at Philemon Community Baptist Church in East Cleveland. Two local radio stations, WZAK 93.1 FM and Z107.9 FM helped promote the event and let community members know to come out and receive a helping hand. DJ Haz Matt from WZAK made announcements live on the radio from the event, and Ro Digga from Z1079 interviewed several of the coordinators of the event on Facebook Live.  The event was truly inspiring. Over 300 families received fresh, healthy food including produce, lean meats, bread and packs of personal care items. Partners who supported this event by collecting donated items from employees and/or the community include Hanson Services, The Cleveland Institute for Community Health, the Cuyahoga County Board of Health, the Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods, The Case Western Reserve University Comprehensive Cancer Care Center, and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Two local retailers, Discount Drug Mart and the Dollar General of Bedford generously contributed multiple shopping cart loads of hygiene and health products from their shelves as well. Helping Hands, a service organization based at Philemon, runs food pantries, community meals, clothing drives and other projects to help neighbors in need.  Anjenette Whitted, who organized all of the volunteers and runs Helping Hands, led us through a seamless event. Cars lined up down the street, and drove through two lines of volunteers ready to load their car. In all, the day filled the hearts of recipients and volunteers with a sense of community and support.

“I help because I can. You never know when you are the one who is going to need a helping hand” ~ Anjenette Whitted.

Cuyahoga County supermarket work receives national recognition

CUYAHOGA COUNTY BOARD OF HEALTH RECEIVES 2018 NACCHO MODEL PRACTICE AWARD
CCBH is one of 29 health departments nationwide to be honored for excellence
The Cuyahoga County Board of Health was presented with the 2018 Model Practice Award by the National Association of City and County Health Officials (NACCHO) at its annual conference in July. The award recognizes local health departments for developing programs that demonstrate exemplary and replicable practices in response to a critical local public health need.
CCBH’s award-winning program, “Implementing High Quality Supermarkets Through Community Organizing and Public Health,” highlights the power of coalition building and resident participation as ways to address unjust access and supermarket quality. The program also focuses on associated issues such as community-based collaboration, employment, and resident quality of life.
OVERVIEW CCBH organized a coalition with the intent of developing a high-quality supermarket in a working-class neighborhood in the city of Euclid, an area with low access to grocery items. The supermarket implementation process was unique as it involved direct participation from nearly 600 local residents. The group offered feedback and oversight in order to ensure food quality standards, to establish and maintain relevance to the neighborhood, and to build trust and accountability with the store owner.
$650,000 was secured by CCBH from a state funding source and the City of Euclid provided $125,000 from its storefront renovation program, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The supermarket now employs 45 workers and sales of fresh produce have exceeded $400,000 in the first ten months of operation.

Click here to read the submission

One Life video sheds light on infant mortality in the Cleveland area

The One Life Documentary was developed by the Cuyahoga County Child and Family Health Service’s Ohio Infant Mortality Reduction Initiative (OIMRI). The goal of the OIMRI program is to reduce the number of Black infants that die before their first birthday by providing supportive services to families in targeted communities. Families in these under-resourced communities, which are predominantly Black communities, are challenged by poor access to quality education and jobs, healthy foods, and affordable quality housing.  This lack of access creates a stressful environment; compounding disadvantages that stand as barriers to a healthy pregnancy and birth outcome.   These stark realities emphasize the need to address these social inequities in order to create fair opportunities for healthy birth outcomes for all families.

One Life explores root causes of Ohio’s alarming high infant mortality rates through local perspectives and personal stories.  Black women, at every socioeconomic level, have higher rates of infant mortality than white women who have not finished high school. In Ohio, black babies die at more than twice the rate of its white babies, and right here in Cuyahoga County, the Black infant mortality rate is three times that of white babies.

For more information please contact Angela Newman at anewman@ccbh.net