Achieving Transformational Change to Improve Opportunity and Health for All

Achieving Transformational Change to Improve Opportunity and Health for All

Registration is open for the HIP-Cuyahoga Consortium Meeting

Mark your calendars and plan to join HIP-Cuyahoga in our yearly convening.
Date: November 15, 2018
Time: 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM
Location: Sheet Metal Workers Hall
12515 Corporate Drive, Parma, OH 44130

Continental breakfast and lunch provided

 

Please join us for HIP-Cuyahoga’s 2018 annual Consortium Meeting! Hear from national and local leaders and join the conversation on how we can sustain our collective efforts, maximize our impact, and transform our region’s health.

Keynote Speaker: Bobby Milstein, ReTHINK Health

Bobby Milstein leads several ReThink Health projects focused on large-scale institutional change, including ongoing development of the ReThink Health Dynamics Model and other tools that allow leaders to negotiate their own scenarios for transforming regional health. Previously, Bobby spent 20 years planning and evaluating system-oriented initiatives at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and was the principal architect of CDC’s framework for program evaluation. He received CDC’s Honor Award for Excellence in Innovation as well as Article of the Year awards for papers published in Health Affairs and Health Promotion Practice. Bobby earned a PhD in public health science from the Union Institute & University, and an MPH from Emory University. He once was a documentary filmmaker and also contributed storylines for The West Wing.

 

 

 

Bobby will discuss opportunities and strategies for transforming health through large-scale institutional and system change. He will underscore insights that have come from looking at how other regional multisector groups develop over time, and how it is necessary to think and act differently together to evolve into a high-functioning and transformational collaborative. Bobby will explore and open conversation about using a fuller range of financing sources to grow and sustain health improvement efforts.

Afternoon Presentations

We will hear from HIP-Cuyahoga partners on their collaborative efforts to transform environments, systems and policies to improve health:

Bike Cleveland 

Building an active transportation culture for better health

 

Northeast Ohio Alliance for HOPE (NOAH) and the Cuyahoga County Board of Health

Campaign for fair access to high quality supermarkets in Cuyahoga County

 

Policy Bridge and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Using an equity and structural racism lens to influence and shape the combined health assessment and health improvement planning efforts

 

Better Health Partnership and United Way of Greater Cleveland

Accountable Health Communities Project partners discuss alignment with HIP-Cuyahoga and our shared agenda for health improvement for all

Registration is now FULL!

Event supported by RWJF Special Contributions Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation

HIP-Cuyahoga awarded “REACH” grant to continue efforts to improve health, prevent chronic diseases, among African Americans in Cuyahoga County

HIP-Cuyahoga awarded “REACH” grant to continue efforts to improve health, prevent chronic diseases, among African Americans in Cuyahoga County

Cuyahoga County Board of Health, on behalf of HIP-Cuyahoga, was notified that they have been awarded the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. This grant award will provide $792,000 annually starting this October and run the next 5 years.

This project will help to advance work that was initiated in 2007, with significant progress made during the recent REACH grant cycle (2014-2018) in the areas of healthy eating, active living, and clinical and community linkages.  HIP-Cuyahoga hopes to improve healthy food access, physical activity and active transportation opportunities, increase breastfeeding supports, and increase the use of community and health support programs among African Americans in Cuyahoga County (see project abstract).

“This REACH award reflects the tangible ways numerous community partners are doing business differently in order to achieve our shared goal of creating community conditions where everyone can reach his or her full potential.  We are very grateful to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for this funding and the recognition that a new level of unprecedented collaboration among REACH partners has occurred in Cuyahoga County.  These and other partners have worked tirelessly over the past 9 years to build relationships of mutual respect and trust in order to more effectively work together to improve health through tackling the toughest determinants of health in our county such as structural racism and poverty. The work of this long-term partnership enabled creation of the current scope of work aimed at preventing chronic disease through a multi-sector, five-year collaborative effort.  This partnership truly reflects the very best of what we can achieve when we work across boundaries to address the most intractable determinants of health in our community.  Through this REACH funding, we look forward to authentically engaging people throughout our community in creating sustainable change for the long-term.” –  Heidi Gullett, HIP-Cuyahoga Co-Chair.

Health Improvement Partnership-Cuyahoga (HIP-Cuyahoga) understands that neighborhoods and communities are not all created equal, and some people are born and live in places where it is difficult to grow up healthy. The conditions in which people live, and the opportunities they have, form the foundation for health and without them, people are more likely to live shorter, sicker lives. The racial disparities in chronic disease health outcomes in our community are the result of historical and contemporary injustices linked to structural racism.

Funded partners for this grant include:

The Cuyahoga County Board of Health, A Vision of Change, Better Health Partnership, Bike Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University (the Center for Community Health Integration and the Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods), Cleveland State University School of Nursing, Fairhill Partners, Kent Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Neighborhood Family Practice, United Way and the YMCA of Greater Cleveland.

About HIP-Cuyahoga

Health Improvement Partnership-Cuyahoga (HIP-Cuyahoga) is a multi-sector, equity-grounded collective impact community consortium. HIP-Cuyahoga’s vision is for our county to be a place where all residents live, work, learn, and play in healthy, sustainable, and prosperous communities. The HIP-Cuyahoga mission is to inspire, influence, and advance policy, environmental and lifestyle changes that foster health and wellness for everyone, through 4 key approaches: perspective transformation, collective impact, community engagement, and health and equity in all policy (see HIP-Cuyahoga brochure).

 

Campaign for Quality Supermarkets

The Northeast Ohio Alliance for Hope (NOAH) is organizing to implement high quality supermarkets in our neighborhoods and needs your help.

We ask for the cooperation of Cuyahoga County to allocate resources to support the implementation of high quality supermarkets and Community Benefits Agreements that seek to promote cooperation and accountability among residents, storeowners and local government.

We believe that the public sector has a responsibility to address disparate access to high quality supermarkets in our county. This petition represents the support of everyday Cuyahoga County residents who believe that fair access to supermarkets is a pressing need in our neighborhoods.

To build opportunities for everyone to have a fair chance to be healthy, we urge Cuyahoga County to support improved access to high quality supermarkets in under-resourced communities.

Residents in East Cleveland and other under-resourced communities are more likely to suffer from chronic diseases and live shorter lives compared to residents in the rest of the county.

High quality supermarkets provide jobs, an increased tax base, healthy and affordable food and attract and stabilize other local businesses. We believe that improved access to high quality supermarkets should be a strategic priority for Cuyahoga County Leadership.

There are recent successful examples in the City of Euclid and in the Buckeye Neighborhood in Cleveland of community-based supermarket implementation projects. Collaboration among local and county government and strong resident participation were integral to providing high quality, stable supermarket access for neighborhoods that previously did not exist.

We ask that Cuyahoga County considers the importance of building wealth within communities most affected by supermarket access issues.

Strategies may include the prioritization of funding for storeowners who live in or reflect the communities that they serve, or who are committed to providing meaningful community benefits such as hiring local, providing community meeting space or budget transparency.

Click here to sign the petition

Simon’s Supermarket stakeholders present at Ohio Statehouse

By: Sam Chin, Creating Healthy Communities Intern

On January 31st, legislative and state agency leaders, grocery store owners, and health service providers gathered at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio for the HFFO Statehouse Lunch Briefing hosted by the Finance Fund. The purpose of this briefing was to provide updates and share the success of current HFFO statewide projects that are improving food access in underserved communities. The five HFFO-funded projects discussed at the briefing are currently providing fresh food to over 35,000 Ohio residents. As   hese projects further establish themselves in their respective communities, the number of people being served is expected to grow tremendously. The success of Simon’s Supermarket in Euclid was shared by Kandace Jones, a former city councilwoman and current resident of Euclid, and Simon Hussain, owner of Simon’s Supermarket. Kandace attributed the success of this grocery store to Simon’s heart for the community, noting that Simon’s Supermarket, “is a business that is giving the community what they want”, as this store provides fresh produce, meats, and grocery delivery to cater to the communities’ needs. Simon cites, “a very high unemployment and no supermarket” as reasons for opening in this particular area of Euclid, and he is excited about the current success and long-term potential of this store. Among the community representatives who shared at the briefing, it was unanimously noted that these projects would not be possible without the aid of HFFO funding. Moving forward, it is our hope that these five projects can serve as leading examples to address poor food access in the under-resourced communities of Ohio and other areas across the country.

 

The Creating Healthy Communities coalition is activating communities to improve access to and affordability of healthy food, increase opportunities for physical activity, and assure tobacco-free living where Ohioans live, work and play. By implementing sustainable evidence-based strategies, CHC is creating a culture of health.

www.cuyahogachc.org