New HIP-Cuyahoga video describes how we learn from history to make our future healthier

Throughout 2017, HIP-Cuyahoga has worked with a local film company, Cinecraft Productions to create a video series. The first video describes the problems HIP-Cuyahoga is working on and our collective efforts to ensure that Cuyahoga County is healthy for EVERYONE. HIP-Cuyahoga recognizes that opportunities are not the same for everyone in Cuyahoga County. Many racial and ethnic groups face steep obstacles and barriers to living healthy and prosperous lives. To build opportunities for everyone in the county to be healthy, HIP-Cuyahoga is learning and understanding how historical policies and practices have shaped current differences in community conditions and opportunities to be healthy, and is now thinking, understanding, valuing and taking action differently.  With this historical perspective and understanding, HIP-Cuyahoga is working with organizations, institutions, key decision makers, community leaders and others to address the structural, systemic and institutional barriers at the root of these opportunity differences.  This video was created with the generous support of the Saint Luke’s Foundation of Cleveland.

 

 

Cleveland Teens Fresh Camp remind us about lead poisoning with ‘Forgotten Homes’ video.

“Forgotten Homes” was composed and written by five area teens who are interns with Fresh Camp, an initiative that amplifies youth voices. The song was made after the interns — Cris Huff, Mecca Primm, Charles Spooney, Derrick Washington and Maurice Philpott Jr. — researched lead poisoning in Cleveland and the historical and racial factors that have allowed it to harm the futures of thousands of children in Cleveland. The song is one from a soon-to-be released CD titled “Drop the Lead” that explored the connections between two problems — gun violence and lead poisoning.

Rachel Dissell from the Cleveland Plain Dealer wrote about the lead poisoning crisis and this video project. 

One Life video sheds light on infant mortality in the Cleveland area

The One Life Documentary was developed by the Cuyahoga County Child and Family Health Service’s Ohio Infant Mortality Reduction Initiative (OIMRI). The goal of the OIMRI program is to reduce the number of Black infants that die before their first birthday by providing supportive services to families in targeted communities. Families in these under-resourced communities, which are predominantly Black communities, are challenged by poor access to quality education and jobs, healthy foods, and affordable quality housing.  This lack of access creates a stressful environment; compounding disadvantages that stand as barriers to a healthy pregnancy and birth outcome.   These stark realities emphasize the need to address these social inequities in order to create fair opportunities for healthy birth outcomes for all families.

One Life explores root causes of Ohio’s alarming high infant mortality rates through local perspectives and personal stories.  Black women, at every socioeconomic level, have higher rates of infant mortality than white women who have not finished high school. In Ohio, black babies die at more than twice the rate of its white babies, and right here in Cuyahoga County, the Black infant mortality rate is three times that of white babies.

For more information please contact Angela Newman at anewman@ccbh.net